Tag Archive for community

The Community Has Spoken – #truBatonRouge

global-communication-background003“HR people and recruiters sure think differently, don’t they?” (quote from #truBatonRouge attendee)

They sure do; and I’ve talked about it quite a bit. I feel somewhat able to pontificate on the subject as I’ve not only worked for an agency, been an internal recruiter, and managed corporate recruiting teams, but have also held numerous HR leadership positions over the years.

If we imagine we’re just one ginormous agrarian society, the recruiters are like the hunters and gatherers who track down the talent; they’re out there fishing in the pond where no-one-else is fishing. The HR practitioners are back home tiling the soil; waiting, as it were, for the food to come to them.

It’s endlessly fascinating to me why these two groups – all invested in finding the right people for the right jobs at the right time – have such differing views on what talent attraction and acquisition looks like. So often, I continue to find, the HR leaders/practitioners in an organization operate via the ‘staffing’ model; let’s open the req, confirm the job description, blast an advert of some sort, and assume the people will come to us. Make the offer, close the req, and wait until the next person quits and we have to fill the same job all over again.

Is it a matter of time and resources for many HR practitioners? It can be. One of the #truBatonrouge attendees was from a rapidly growing organization with 600 employees where it’s no doubt a challenge to create a strategic sourcing and recruiting strategy when there are 3 people in the entire HR Department and they also handle payroll, benefits, comp, FMLA/ADA/WC, employee relations, etc. etc. etc. Out of necessity, perhaps more than anything else, they’ve migrated to a model where the hiring managers are fully empowered to handle all their own hiring; HR manages the process, workflow, and tools, but is hands off unless specifically asked to participate.

Without a dedicated recruiter the 25+ open positions they have (I checked) are, more than likely, being blasted to job boards in an attempt to get as many warm bodies loaded into the recruitment funnel as possible.

It’s the HR way.

And I anticipated this sort of tension – if that’s the right word – to rise to the top when I planned the event. Knowing the market here in south Louisiana the attendees were a varied bunch: we had a handful of recruiters, a gaggle of HR professionals (generalists who have recruiting as one of their responsibilities), some entrepreneurs, a health care executive, a bunch of organizational development folks, and a few communication/marketing professionals.

So what did we talk about?

I led a track on the “The Problem with Job Interviews” which focused on exploring things like uselessness due to lack of planning and our focus on hiring for “fit” when we don’t even know what that really means. We dove into the impact of bias – with confirmation bias being one of the biggies as we seek to confirm our initial gut feeling from the first 90 seconds with an applicant. We chatted about the use of data. We conversed about how many interviews is too many; one attendee reported he had multiple visits and met with 15 interviewers for a job. Sweet fancy Moses.

Casey Kugler led a track on “Recruiting Tips from a Corporate Recruiter” and discussed sourcing and searching strategies. He shared the results of an experiment he recently conducted to see if taking the time to personally construct LinkedIn communication (“Hi Joe…I see you like Pearl Jam!”) garnered more results than generic messages (note: he saw a 3% improvement). Darren Sherrard, Associate Director for Recruitment with the VA, discussed recruitment marketing and specifically chatted about paid vs. earned media as well as the evolution/merging/blurring of PR and recruitment marketing.

We had a track called “Fear and Loathing in Succession Planning” and dove into the topic “Are YOU the only one who cares about your Performance Management Program” with Sandy Michelet. The latter discussion was interesting; enough HR/OD people expressed a desire to hang on to numbers, rankings, ratings, and forms that it appears the shitty performance appraisals we’re often saddled with aren’t going anywhere soon.

We wrapped up the day with a free-wheeling discussion merging all sorts of topics together with a focus on how HR/Talent professionals can, perhaps, innovate; wellness (ugh!), use of technology, the digital divide, and spirituality in the workplace/business environment all landed on the table.

It. Was. Awesome.

We held #truNOLA in 2012, but I wanted to hold an event in Baton Rouge to gather more people together who have an interest in talent, recruiting and the evolution of work. I wanted varied experiences and differing opinions. I wanted people to meet and connect and build community.

And we did.

Thanks to Devin Lemoine and the team at Success Labs for providing the space and hosting us for the day, and thanks to my friend Bill Boorman, founder of #tru, who believes in building this global community.

“Those HR people and recruiters can get on the same page after all.” (me)

It’s a Book. It’s Humane. It’s Personnel?

This Time It's PersonnelLast year, the wonderful David D’Souza (@dds180) conceived, created and curated a book called Humane, Resourced: A Book of Blogs. With contributions from more than 50 HR professionals, bloggers and writers, it charted on Amazon as a top selling HR book in the UK. You can find the book at Amazon UK or Amazon and easily download it for Kindle.

And now there’s a sequel!

This Time, It’s Personnel: The Book was released on November 1st and by November 3rd it topped the charts for Kindle books in the UK, becoming the top selling UK HR book – even including actual you-have-to-hold-them-in-your-hand books! It’s available from the Amazon international store here and from the Amazon UK store here.

What makes this sequel a must read?

  • There are even more contributors: 25% more authors than the first book
  • Lynda Gratton wrote the foreword. Lynda is a Professor of Management Practice at London Business School where she directs the program ‘Human Resource Strategy in Transforming Companies’ – considered the world’s leading program on human resources.
  • Chester Elton – who has sold over a million books himself – contributed a chapter
  • The money raised from sales goes to charity (sales from Humane, Resourced: A Book of Blogs supported charities involved with mental health, disability, cancer research and sexual health)

Oh…and I contributed a chapter!

There were a few others who assisted with the book and I want to send a shout out to Kate Griffiths-Lambeth (@kategl) and Alison Chisnell (@alisonchisnell) as well as Simon Heath (@simonheath1) who provided the artwork for both books.

So listen up HR people … we have incredible opportunities to connect, share and collaborate with people from around the world and this book is a representation of our international HR community. Please take a few seconds to download it, read it and spread the word.

After all it’s personal…personnel…HUMAN resources.

Conference Culture and Local Flavor

Flavor FlavLast week I was fortunate to attend 3 separate SHRM conferences right here in Louisiana; the SHRM Diversity and Inclusion Conference and Exposition, the New Orleans SHRM (chapter) Annual Conference and the Greater Baton Rouge (chapter) Annual Conference. All were excellent. And all were different.

I posted my thoughts on Facebook at the end of the week and, in a side conversation with someone, got accused of being mean-spirited and harsh in referencing particular aspects. Look…I’m not Gallup or Nielsen running a poll; I’m a gal who happened to go to 3 conferences in a week and noted the overall conference experience – as-I-saw-it. I merely pointed out how these three events differed, in my opinion. It’s why I write a blog for god’s sake.

Here’s what I said:

SHRM Diversity & Inclusion Conference – great energy and excitement; people from all over the country/world who “knew” each other; cutting edge conversations; provocative conversations that push the profession forward; networking and connecting highly emphasized

NOLA SHRM – strong existing personal connections among attendees; friendly and welcoming crowd; standard HR content (mid-level and senior level content) with nuggets from each speaker that offered opportunities for “ah – I never thought of it that way” moments; lots of humor and fun; vendors drawings were for gift baskets of booze; attendees stayed until the end; scheduled networking event afterwards for cocktails with a batch of HR folks and speakers who hung around for it

GBR Society for Human Resource Management – serious business with lots of suits; less personal connections amongst the wider group as people danced (sat) with those they came with; standard HR content (geared to entry or mid-level pros); less humor; a number of attendees left mid-afternoon; vendor drawings were for Starbucks gift cards; no scheduled networking or social

 

Every event was superbly executed by the organizers and appeared to meet the needs and expectations of its intended audience. The folks who came to see Daymond John and Chaz Bono would not, I’m venturing a guess, have been interested in attending a session on Labor Relations (NOLASHRM) or updates on the ACA (Baton Rouge).

And that’s…OK. The organizers at all 3 events knew the type of content their attendees expected and delivered it. I have friends who head to recruiting conferences who would have rather jumped in the Mississippi River than attend the vast majority of these sessions but you know what? They don’t come to HR conferences; they head to the events that provide what they need.

What intrigued me about the week is that the events all fall under the SHRM umbrella; we’re all part of the same ‘family’ yet Uncle Joe is a bit different than Uncle Sam. There are 60 miles that separate the cities of Baton Rouge and New Orleans, but, as anyone who lives here can tell you, it’s more than mere miles down the I-10.

And that was my point with the observations.

It’s a bit like working for a geographically dispersed company with a well-defined and articulated culture. The company’s mission, vision and values may be in alignment with employee behavior but, at the end of the day, there are variations in implementation by micro-groups. The needs and wants of sub-groups differ – even as they go about aligning themselves with the overall.

  • “Our company has a casual environment and culture but we still like to wear suits here in the Chicago office.” 
  • “Sure, we socialize here in Jackson. We go out to lunch as a team but I would never head to Happy Hour with my co-workers. I just want to get home at the end of the day.”
  • “The GM for our site added a foosball table in the break room for weekly tournaments. It’s a lot of fun and I go to support everyone but I’m just a bit more serious than everyone else so I never sign up to play.”

Mea culpa to anyone who thought I was ‘slamming’ their efforts or results.

It’s hard to sell snow shovels in the deep south and there’s really not a market for pirogues in the midwest.

And that’s…OK.

Beauty Queens on the Bayou – #MissUSA #goBR

site_promo1398180413LivefromBatonRouge2As a child (ages 6 through 10) there were two things I always role-played in the comfort of my home – Office and Beauty Pageant.

When playing Office I would move a dining room chair into the living room and place a TV tray in front of it. On the TV tray I placed (neatly!) a pad of paper, multiple pens and pencils, a stapler and/or tape dispenser, and my Fisher Price telephone.  I slipped on a jacket from one of my mother’s suits, clipped on a pair of her earrings, and spent glorious hours being super efficient while taking (imaginary) phone calls, writing (imaginary) work orders and ordering (imaginary) minions about to do my business.

Beauty Pageant was my go-to-role-play when I was freshly scrubbed and released from my mother’s tyranny of the bathtub.  Feeling super chic in my long flannel nightgown, accessorized with my bathrobe artfully flung about my shoulders and a pair of my mother’s peep toe high heels, I prepared for my crowning. I lined up my dolls on the sofa, grabbed a bouquet of artificial flowers to hold in my arms, and, suitably attired, made a grand entrance into the living room.  I humbly acknowledged the (imaginary) thunderous applause as I sobbed uncontrollably and blew kisses to the (imaginary) adoring throngs.

The Beauty Pageant dream died out l-o-n-g ago. Playing Office however, came in handy when I decided to spend 25 years working in Human Resources.  After all, starting at age 6 I wrote memos that no one read, had phone conversations where no one listened, and assumed that ordering people around signaled my authority and influence……….

But you know what guys and gals?

For the next 11 days I get to play Beauty Pageant!!!

OK – I don’t think it’s called a Beauty Pageant anymore; the correct terminology appears to be competition.  And while, obviously, the women who compete are physically lovely the various systems/organizations that run these events have worked pretty hard to make sure the programs also highlight talent and scholarship and accomplishments – stuff that goes well beyond great hair, long legs and super white teeth.

Although I doubt I will get to try on the crown or anything, I will be front and center to the hubbub as an official Social Media Ambassador for the #MissUSA 2014 pageant working in conjunction with Visit Baton Rouge and the Baton Rouge Social Media Association.   This, I have to tell y’all, is quite thrilling.

Naturally, while circling in the orbit of these 51 impossibly beautiful and accomplished contestants, I’m sure I will feel incredibly dowdy and frumpy. I’m already imagining that I will overhear Miss Idaho quiz Miss Wisconsin with a whispered “Who is that woman in the sensible shoes with the Coach bag?  She looks like an HR lady.”

For you however, my dear and loyal HR Schoolhouse readers, I shall persevere.  I shall tweet and Instagram and blog and snap pictures of Nene Leakes (!!!) and Larry Fitzgerald. I shall, if allowed, provide coverage of every flute player, baton twirler and opera singer I can find. My intent is to explore and assess the HR/work/talent related dynamics of the whole event and organization which I find incredibly mysterious and fascinating. I’m willing to bet that I can find a whole new spin on ‘authenticity’ and ‘brand’ in the pageant world.  Just a guess.

I also intend to give you a glimpse of the cool things that are going on here in Baton Rouge. So be warned – if you are following me on the twitterz you will see all sorts of stuff with the hashtags #MissUSA #goBR and #krewedecrown.  Roll with me.

Plus, even though I totally do not meet any of the qualifying criteria anymore, I might still get the inside scoop on becoming the next Miss USA!

Not sure though if my flannel nightgown would still be suitable for pageant competition.